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Saving You Money through Simple Methods

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Does Saving Money Save You Money?

Clearance Deal of the DayCould not live without!  (never used)

 

When you read a blog about saving money, you already possess the most important aspect needed, proper mindset.  Financial awareness is a key component in saving money over the long term.  It’s very easy to think that saving a dollar here or there is no big deal.  For instance, I always use those credit cards which give me the highest return on every purchase.  I have an American Express Blue Cash Preferred card that gives 6% cashback at the grocery and I will use it every single time.  My wife on the other hand will go to the grocery store and just grab any card available.  Her rationale is that if she is only spending $20, that card would only save $1.20 so it’s no big deal.  However, every trip to the gas station, grocery store, or other retail establishment offers a chance to save.  The way I see it is that if I’m going to be making the purchase either way, why not put it on a credit card that will reward me for that purchase?  Why use cash when I can pay with a credit card and get an instant discount a discount that comes after I shop for the best prices and use cashback portals!

The biggest problem for many of us comes from trying to save significant amounts of money by purchasing things we otherwise do not need.  The “Extreme Couponing” craze is one such example of this as those people who follow these methods clip every coupon every week.  If I can buy a can of beets for 10 cents each why not do it?  Because nobody likes beets, they’re garbage, they taste gross and you just wasted your money! This is the opposite of not using your discount when the amounts are small.  You use the discount on items that are deeply discounted, but do they offer a value to you?  If you were some kind of masochist with a beet addiction 100 cans of beets is a fantastic deal and likely saved you about $100, but if you are a normal human being then you probably would have been better off burning the $10 you spent.

This phenomenon is not only present in the extreme couponing circuit.  In fact, every trip to Target provides an opportunity for those demons lurking on the endcaps to claw at your soul.  As you walk the perimeter of the store you see the red homing beacon that are the red clearance stickers.  They sing to you from the cream colored shelves like Sirens in the Tyrrhenian Sea.  Powerless over the possibility of saving tremendous amounts of money you are pulled into their orbit.  Assuming you are not currently reading this while at Target, let’s speak rationally about these fine deals.  Clearance items are only a deal if these are things you would normally buy anyway.  If you have been looking for a bedding set, and had decided on one that was $300 and you find one on clearance for $50 this is a superb deal.  By contrast if you are walking down the aisle and see 80% off a camo beer coozy that says , “My neck may be red, but I’m well read” don’t buy it.  Actually, you’re probably getting this ironically, you can go ahead and get that.  The point is that these items that are “only a dollar” really tend to add up over the course of the year.  In fact these can add up far faster than the “only a dollar” rewards my wife loses when she fails to use the right credit card.

It’s far too easy to base your savings off the MSRP rather than what you truly value an item to be worth.  A better exercise would be to look at these clearance items and ask, “Do I need it? Do I really want it? Would I buy it anyway?  What is it worth to me?”.  So if you walk past the endcap and sunscreen is on sale at 75% off go ahead and pick some up because you probably need it and if you don’t buy it now you will buy some day.  If you walk past the aisle and there is something you have always wanted, but price has kept you from buying it then I think this is a fair purchase.  The Suze Ormans of the world would disagree and advise you to only buy absolute necessities,  fund your emergency savings, fully fund all retirement accounts and then with anything leftover spend money on your wants.  My opinion on this is that sometimes you need to spend some money on the things you want.  So if there is a lamp or shirt you think looks great buy it.

The problem with these deep discounts is that we often go overboard on these clearance items.  In the haze of getting a great deal we often make purchases of things that we do not need or even really want.  As I am composing this my wife came in the door with 3 big bags from Target.  She purchased an $18 lifejacket for $5.38, not a bad deal since our kids will need a lifejacket next year and if she did not make the purchase on clearance we would have paid closer to 20.  However, she also purchased a rug which was on sale for $7.50, she wanted a rug, but I have a feeling that all things equal she never would have bought this style.

My wife happened to be the person who peaked my interest on this topic.  She said, “I used to never look for sales and just buy things I wanted.  I think that I spent less back then than I do now.”  Her hypothesis was that when you go into a store and do not look at prices (but have limited funds) you only purchase things you really want.  Both of us have been guilty of going to Target and buying multiple items, especially clothing, which were on sale.  When my beautiful wife last cleaned out her closet there were multiple items new with tags.  Just as bad there were countless items that she wore only once.  She is not the only one guilty of this either.  I have gone into the store at certain times of the year and bought 5 pair of shorts, but only ended up wearing 3 of the pairs and only a couple times.  Once it’s time to wear them again I’ve undoubtedly gained or lost weight making them useless.

Rather than buying multiples of things you like a little, buying one thing that you really love can be a better deal.  At the beginning of the summer I bought one pair of golf shorts for regular price, but only bought one pair.  I wore these shorts a couple times per week all summer long.  At the end of the year they were 50% off so naturally I bought 5 pairs!  Yet I have worn each pair only once.  One pair is still in my closet untagged.  Basically I spent $20 and wore the shorts 30 times (60 cents per wear), but spent $50 on the discounted shorts and worn those only 5 times ($10 per wear).  So even though my closet looks better with more choices, I’ve likely wasted money overall.  Of course the best option would have been to buy only 1 or 2 pair on clearance and then wear them and I’m saving money.  The problem with clearance deals is they usually don’t work like that.  You end up overspending on things that you don’t need because you feel like you’re saving money.  Unless we think about this consciously we are all subject to doing it.  Which brings me to the question, does anyone want to buy a case of corn on the cob holders?  Accidentally bought too many.  Asking for a friend.

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How We Bought 4 Plane Tickets, 7 Nights Hotel and 7 Nights SUV Rental for $40

Anyone who has read previous entries to this blog knows that two of my favorite things to do are spending time with my family and getting good value. This year for our fall trip we decided to, once again, fly to California. This is usually a trip that would be beyond our grasps financially due to the immense expenses involved with flying across the country. To make this trip a reality I relied on various points and miles programs offered by hotels.

IMG_3710

 

Itinerary

 

The trip included flying into San Francisco then looping around to Yosemite National Park, Sequoia National Park, Monterey and back to San Francisco. This itinerary required 4 round-trip tickets from Louisville to San Francisco, 7 day SUV Rental and 7 nights of lodging. The total cost for only these expenditures would have been $3,256. If you were pricing this out you probably could have searched for better deals and alternate lodging, but the prices I included were for the exact same flights, rental car and hotels that we used. This MSRP value assumes that you just booked the going rates without using other discounts. If you are not interested in the details of each portion of the itinerary scroll to the conclusion section where I will outline all the details including points used and the price without points.

 

Flight

 

We flew Southwest using Rapid Rewards Points, which are tied to the actual cost of the flights. Therefore when flying Southwest whether purchasing tickets with cash or using points it is extremely important to purchase tickets at the lowest fare (which also means the lowest points). Since our youngest child is 25 months old he is over 2 years old his ticket costs the same as an adult fare. This required us to purchase 4 tickets. As soon as the month of October opened up for booking I started checking Southwest on a weekly basis (at least). They offer new sales every Tuesday, some sales are great and some sales are pretty weak. The great thing about Southwest is that there is no fee to cancel your flights, so if you book at one price and the next sale is better you can cancel those tickets and book again.

 

In June the price of tickets round-trip dropped to $350 each (plus $10 for taxes and fees). If I had not prepared for this then the cost for tickets alone would have been $1,400 (plus $40 for taxes and fees). Since I qualified for the Companion Pass, any ticket that I book on Southwest allows me to add a companion to travel with me free of charge. Anyone reading this who has the companion pass, but not enough points to book tickets that way would have paid $1,050 for the tickets (plus $40 for taxes and fees). Since we had the Companion Pass and enough Rapid Reward Points I was able to book this flight for 61,734 points. Alternatively Chase Ultimate Reward Points transfer to Southwest at a 1:1 ratio meaning I could have transferred as many points as I needed from Chase Ultimate Rewards with no cost.

 

Car Rental

 

Since our itinerary required a great deal of driving renting a car was a necessity. Since we have a stroller and a few bags I decided to go with an SUV for this trip. I used carrentalsavers.com to look up rates and found that Alamo offered the most value. I then went to my Chase Ultimate Rewards account to book through them as they offer a “pay with points” option which gives these points a value of 1.25 cents per point.

 

We rented a 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee which would have cost $433.68 for 7 days booking directly through Alamo after taxes and fees were applied to the total. In lieu of this I was able to book the week using Chase Ultimate Reward points. The total was 20,696 Chase Ultimate Reward Points which actually ended up getting me 2.1 cents per point. To put this into perspective my wife and I both got 25,000 Chase Ultimate Reward points when we signed up for the Chase Freedom card which has no annual fee. So that amounts to about $500 worth of signing bonus for each card.

 

If you are considering this particular itinerary keep in mind that we drove the rental car over 1,000 miles. We spent $152 on fuel that we paid for using point earning cards, but did not pay with actual points.

 

Hotels

 

When creating an itinerary involving multiple destinations the hotel accommodations are the most difficult and arguably the most important of the trip. Using Google Maps I plotted out the trip to the best of my ability. We arrived in San Francisco, saw some sights in the city and headed toward Yosemite. I found that the Modesto and Turlock area was about half way between these two locations. Finding lodging near a national park is very difficult and you pay dearly for the location and often give up a lot in quality of hotel (unless you pay much more). I decided that Comfort Suites worked well for our night in Turlock. We booked a double Queen suite which had two queen beds and a pullout couch. This room was one of the bigger hotel rooms that we have stayed in and it was very nice. The normal cash cost for this room was $139 plus tax per night. It cost us 16,000 choice hotel points. If you sign up for the Choice Hotels Visa you get a 32,000 point signing bonus which would cover 2 nights.

SimplisticSaving.com Comfort Suites Turlock

 

After visiting Yosemite we made our way toward Fresno which is almost directly between Yosemite and Sequoias. Our plan was to have 2 nights in Fresno, one night between Yosemite and Sequoias and another night spent after our day in the Sequoia National Park. Using Club Carlson Reward Points we were able to stay in a Country Inn & Suites which worked out quite nicely because when you have the Club Carlson credit card you get your last night free on a stay of 2 or more nights. Obviously there is more value if you only stay two nights. Normally a room costs $92.50 per night or 15,000 Club Carlson points. Since we have the Club Carlson Visa we used 15,000 points for 2 nights which is 7,500 points per night.

 

After our second night in Fresno we headed to Monterey. This is the only portion of the trip that I did not book in advance. We could have stayed using points for the night, but instead we opted to use Hotel Tonight. Hotel Tonight found us the Best Western Plus in Monterey which is directly on the beach. The normal cost for this is $160 per night plus $18 per night parking. On hotel tonight it was $132 plus $18 parking. A total of $150 for the night. Using American Express Membership Reward Points to wipe out this charge cost 22,000 points.

SimplisticSaving.com 17 Mile Drive Monterey17 Mile Drive in Monterey, CA

 

After our day in Monterey we traveled back to San Francisco. I decided that stopping halfway between Monterey and San Francisco would not only be more economical, but it would allow for us to get to the hotel a bit earlier and relax. We stopped in Silicon Valley at the Four Points by Sheraton – San Jose. This hotel usually runs $180 per night, but I was able to book a room for 4,000 SPG points. My wife and I both have an SPG Credit Card which awarded us a bonus of 25,000 points for signing up. This offered a great value. Although this was a lower category hotel for the chain it was still beautiful. Starwoods Hotels include W, Westin, Sheraton and many high end brands.

SimplisticSaving.com Four Points Sheraton Lobby

Picture of the Four Points by Sheraton Lobby

 

Our final stay was for 2 nights in San Francisco. We stayed at the Radisson in the middle of Fisherman’s Wharf. The location was superb and the hotel was updated in 2012. We were very impressed with the accommodations. The normal rate at this location is $299 per night and parking is an additional $50 per night. Like Country Inn & Suites, Radisson is also part of Club Carlson and we were able to use 50,000 Club Carlson Reward Points for this stay. The normal charge for points is 50,000 points per night, but having the Club Carlson Visa allows your last night of a 2 night (or longer) stay to be free. Along with this huge benefit you are given Gold Elite status which we found very beneficial at this hotel. When we arrived at check-in they told me that as a VIP member my room had been upgraded free of charge to a balcony room on the top floor. As a Gold Elite member they also waived the $50 per night parking charge. When we arrived in our room there was a “welcome gift” of a bag of kettle corn waiting for us in the room. Attached to the gift was a card thanking us for choosing to stay at their hotel for our trip. My children and I went to the pool while my wife got comfortable in the room. Someone stopped by the room during that time to bring us extra towels and a couple bottles of water to welcome their “VIPs”. The sign up bonus for the Club Carlson Card is 85,000 points, plus you get the last night booked with points free and are automatically upgraded to Gold Elite status. On this stay alone we used 50,000 points, but managed to save $299 per night on the hotel, plus $50 each night on parking. So for this stay 50,000 points equaled over $700 in value! That’s not even considering the free upgrade to the balcony room closest to the bay with a tremendous view of Alcatraz.

 

IMG_5123                                                                                                                    Actual Unobstructed View From Radisson Balcony – Blue Angels Flying Over Alcatraz

 

Conclusion

 

All told we received $3,256 in value but paid only $40 for flight, lodging and SUV rental. I put a valuation of dollar per point received. Many of these calculations depend on how they are used. For instance, American Express Membership Reward points used for this stay were worth less than a penny each, but can be used much more beneficially when transferred to another program. SPG points were worth 4.5 cents each used at this particular location. The value of hotel points can be a bit skewed because if I had not had hotel points I would not pay $180 or $350 per night for a hotel room. I would probably sacrifice a bit of quality for a lower price. However, using points allows the user to splurge and afford things that normally would have been out of reach.

 

Retail Price                   Actual Paid               Points                $/Point

 

Southwest – Louisville to San Francisco                                          $1,440                                $40                61,734                   .023

Southwest Rapid Rewards

 

Alamo Mid-Size SUV Rental (7 Days)                                                 $434                                  0                  20,696                   .021

Chase Ultimate Rewards

 

Choice Hotels- Comfort Suites Turlock                                             $139                                   0                  16,000                   .009

Choice Priveleges

 

Country Inn Fresno (2 Nights)                                                           $185                                   0                 15,000                    .012

Club Carlson Rewards

 

Best Western Plus Monterey Beach Resort                                    $178                                   0                  22,000                   .008

American Express Membership Rewards

 

Four Points by Sheraton – San Jose                                                $180                                 0                    4,000                    .045

Starwoods Preferred Guest

 

Radisson Fisherman’s Wharf                                                         $700                                  0                   50,000                   .014

Club Carlson Rewards

 

Total

$3,256                             $40                   189,430                   .017

 

 

 

 

 

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How I earned 6% Cashback and 20 points per dollar on Spending this year

 

“Daddy, can we fly on a plane someday?” A simple question set forth by my daughter January of this year. As a father and husband I wanted nothing more than to book a flight to some beautiful destination at that moment. Unfortunately, in my capacity as the personal financial planner I am much less flexible. Absent a wealthy philanthropist deciding to sponsor our family sometimes we will not be afforded certain luxuries.

 

 

A few days later my brothers returned from a ski trip and my mother suggested that we take a big family ski vacation during Christmas Break. In the same way that my daughter’s idea to fly on a plane sounded fun, this also sounded great. However, my mind slipped back into the “how can I make this happen” mode. Obviously to even consider this kind of endeavor we would need to tighten our purse strings and save as much money as possible. We would need to purchase at least 3 plane tickets, which would cost at least $300 each. At this point I stumbled upon credit card offers that may help my family out.

 

 

I have been a long time user of a couple different cashback reward cards and feel that these are fantastic. The first card I signed up for was an American Express Blue Cash Preferred Card that would earn me $200 sign up bonus and 6% cashback on any grocery purchases. At this point I figured that I would buy gift cards from Kroger and use the extra $200 bonus to pay for these. This card also has a 0% intro rate for 12 months so it was nice. This card is very nice, but is only part of my overall spending strategy. It seemed that the more I looked into credit card offers the more benefits I found.

 

 

After that card I found the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card which has a 40,000 point signing bonus which can be used as a statement credit and be worth $400! I signed up for this card as well, met the spending and got the bonus points.

 

 

My biggest score of the year I will be writing in more detail about in a few days, but I was able to sign up for 2 Southwest credit cards. This netted me 106,000 points which are good toward about $1,908 worth of flights, but it actually gets better. When you earn 110,000 points in one year you earn a “Companion Pass”, this allows me the opportunity to bring a companion (my wife) along with me for free on any trip I book. Even if that flight is booked and paid with points. This effectively doubles the value of my points.

 

 

So far this year, as of 7/30/2013, my wife and I have racked up many miles, points and cashback. These have been earned through cashback portals and credit cards. In cashback alone we earned more than $775 in cashback. Even after paying the $75 annual fee on my AMEX we have earned over $700 cashback this year on our AMEX, Discover, Gas Reward Card and TopCashBack. We earned nearly 6 cents back on every dollar spent. We used this money to purchase a computer, which I built.

 

 

Even more amazing is our return on points and miles! We have earned over 400,000 miles! Even if you value these at only 1 penny each this means we have $4,000 worth of travel in our future. However, 235,000 of these miles can be used toward Southwest, which means they are worth about 1.8 cents per mile (doubled to 3.6 cents per mile with Companion Pass)! If we used all of these for flying Southwest we could get as much as $8,460 worth of travel on those 235,000 miles. Most of these points and miles came from bonuses and they all came from spending money normally. We earned nearly 20 points per dollar spent. That is like getting a 20% (or more) discount on everything we bought, even after finding the lowest prices.

 

 

In order to maximize our points per dollar spent we focus our credit card spending on those cards that provide the biggest payoff. I have a 6% Grocery Card, 5% Gas Card, 2 points per dollar on restaurant and travel. Even with these bigger returns my focus is on meeting spending limits on individual cards that offer big bonuses. If I need to spend $5,000 in 3 months to earn 60,000 points this is far more lucrative than the 5% or 6%. So if I am at the grocery and have not hit my $5,000 amount I will use the card with a spending goal rather than a 6% grocery card.

 

 

Using credit cards has been very lucrative for us this year and we look forward to taking many enjoyable trips at a deep discount. The use of credit cards inappropriately can be very dangerous. If you do not have the money to spend in cash, then using a credit card for spending is out of the question as well. We pay off our bills every month and have not paid any credit card fees over this amount of time. Also be sure to not bite off more than you can chew. For instance if you spend $1,000 a month normally do not sign up for cards that will require you to spend $4,000 each month in order to get the bonus.

 

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Lower Grocery Budget without Extreme Couponing

 

junk-foodphoto

Food expenditures are probably the easiest places to make budget cuts for younger Americans, but the grocery budget is also the easiest to justify keeping.  After all, statistics show that most Americans eat food on a regular basis (citation needed).  In fact, many scientists would probably agree that food is nearly a necessity for human survival.  With all of these facts buried in your brain, spending money on food is viewed as a necessity and unconsciously we reason that “our bodies need the nourishment and our bodies are worth the expense”.  There is nothing wrong with this assertion on the surface we do need to feed our bodies quality foods in order to keep them working in optimal condition.  Unfortunately, drawing a line between expense, nutrition and necessity is based on flawed logic.

Let me be clear, I am not advocating only consuming a dense diet void of any taste, but I would reason that spending more on your groceries does not make you healthier or love yourself any more than the rest of us.  I have drilled down into my spending data for the past few years and have noticed some amazing trends.  The statistics show (in my household), that those times when our food bill is lower correlate with better eating habits.  So, I can back into the reasoning that spending less on food makes my family healthier (not even considering less stress that accompanies bettering your financial situation).

I know that there are those among you that will argue, “it’s cheaper to eat unhealthy foods than it is to eat healthy.”  In many ways this assertion is correct, but there are moves we can make that swing the scale in our favor.  We must learn to value our food differently.  Rather than looking at food’s value on a calorie per dollar basis, we need to evaluate foods on a nutrients per dollar basis.  It’s much easier to get full on high quality foods.  Try this experiment, eat as much chicken and broccoli as possible, then eat a similar meal from McDonald’s.  You will consume more nutrition, get full on far fewer calories and spend less.

Eat at Home

Without question eating at home saves money.  If you are spending more by eating at home, you’re doing it wrong.

 

Go to the Grocery for Big Trips After Dinner

The times when we eat most unhealthy and spend the most money happen to coincide with those times when we have less food available at home.  Too often my wife and I will look in the refrigerator or pantry and say, “You want to go get some dinner?”.  This plays out poorly and expensively in two ways.  First, if we go out to dinner we will spend between $10 and $30 for that meal.  Option 2 is that we go to the grocery with our hungry eyes.  We purchase those items that would not be part of a normal shopping list.  From a psychological perspective it’s much easier to handle these smaller expenditures.  You don’t feel like you’re spending much money if you just spend $25 on most of your grocery trips.  It’s easy to splurge when your total is relatively low, plus you’re hungry and you’re worth it.

Going to the grocery for one big trip each week is easier to handle because you are less likely to make off the wall purchases.  Going to the grocery on a full stomach keeps your brain in control of food purchases.

Make a List

Knowing the items that your family consumes is important for shopping successfully.  Some items that we always try to keep in our house are Bread, Chicken Breasts, Ground Turkey, Ground Beef, Frozen Vegetables, Cottage Cheese, Peanut Butter and the list goes on.  The point is that we have taken a mental inventory of those items we eat on a regular basis and we buy them when they are on sale.  These tips also can be applied to other non-food items as well.  We are not super rigid with our lists, but we know that keeping these key items on hand around our house give us many of the ingredients needed for dishes we eat regularly.

Shop the Sales or go to a Salvage Grocery Store

This likely goes without saying, but making purchases when items are on sale is pivotal to saving money.  Knowing the list of ingredients your family enjoys is key, but so is purchasing these items when they are at their lowest prices.  At our local grocery store the regular price on a loaf of “Nature’s Own” bread is about $3 per loaf, but at the local Salvage Grocery Store they sell the same exact bread for $1 per loaf.  It’s the same delivery guy and everything.  Very often, going to a salvage grocery store is a better deal than even regular couponing and sale shopping.  Most recently, I found a 10 pound  “Black Forest Ham” that is normally found behind the deli counter.  At the local deli they charge more than $5 per pound on this item, but I bought this for $2 a pound.  Always keep stocked up, it might cost more up front, but you spend much less over time.

Buy a Freezer

Frigidaire Freezer

Around the holiday season 2012 my wife and I really started to embrace the stocking up on sales mentality.  We found turkeys were deeply discounted for Thanksgiving.  We ended up buying 6 of them in total and each one was a great deal.  I think the two cheapest were less than 20 cents per pound.  We also found glazed hams for at GFS for $1.30 per pound and ground turkey for $1.45 per pound.  We bought 100 pounds of the ground turkey and 5 hams.  We spent a ton of money, but we used my parent’s spare freezer to store these items, but it was running out of room.  It was then that my wife and I decided that we needed our own freezer.  We ended up purchasing a stainless steel upright freezer that was on sale at Lowe’s.  We ended up spending about $600 for the freezer, but by having the freezer we were able to capitalize on sale prices.  One of our first purchases after buying the freezer was buying boneless skinless chicken breasts by the case at Sam’s Club.  Normal price for chicken breasts seem to hover around $4 per pound or more.  We ended up buying 100 pounds for $1.77 per pound.  Our freezer has already saved us more than it cost in the ability to always eat sale priced food.

Credit Card Cashback

Of course anyone who has read the blog knows that I advocate getting money back by using credit cards for purchases you are making anyway.  So while you’re buying food on sale you might as well get a bonus discount after all your sale prices, coupons and smart shopping are considered.  With the exception of Sam’s Club, I can get cashback for grocery purchases.  One card give 5% at grocery stores, another gives 6% cashback at grocery stores which can really save quite a bit of money over the course of a year.  If I spend $6,000 a year at grocery stores then I will get $360 cashback on my American Express card which is pretty great for expenses I would incur under any scenario.

Start a Garden

Vegetables can be quite expensive when purchased at the grocery store.  My dear wifey bought bell peppers last week at Kroger for 50 cents each because she needed them for a recipe she had been eying.  We have grown accustomed to having a garden, but with the move and home renovation we did not get one planted soon enough.  Today we went to the local farmer’s market and actually purchased pepper plants for 50 cents each.  Even if each plant only produces one pepper we will be ahead.  We planted a late summer garden today and all of the seeds were a bit over $10.  Hopefully this small investment and minimal sweat equity will end up paying for itself many times over as we enjoy our fresh organic vegetables this fall for minimal cost.

 

 

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Reward Miles and Points Valuation

Trying to decide how to top off the extra 5,000 miles I needed to attain a companion pass I tried to do some evaluation of valuations.  I looked around to see different ways to transfer miles to Southwest that will count toward the companion pass.  I have some Ultimate Reward points from Chase, which transfer to Southwest at a 1 to 1 ratio, but do not count toward the Companion Pass.  However, transfers from Hyatt to Southwest do count, but the transfers from Hyatt to Southwest are at a rate of 10,000 Hyatt points to 4,800 Southwest points.  I would transfer 10,000 Chase Ultimate Rewards to Hyatt and then get 4,800 points.  How could I even consider such?  Afterall Chase Ultimate Rewards are worth 2 cents per mile and with this valuation I would be getting only 48% of the possible value.  A poor value proposition by any standards.  This got me thinking, what is a point worth to me?

Ultimately I did not decide to go this route, but it did make me further examine valuations that I have seen on other blogs.   The most baffling valuation to me comes from Starwood Preferred Guest points and their SPG AMEX card with a 25,000 point bonus.  It seems like many bloggers push its benefits and some say that it’s worth 2 cents per point.  Making the sign up bonus worth at least $500.  I have not signed up for this card, because it does not seem very valuable to me. Many people argue that you take the retail price of a room and divide it by the number of points needed and you come up with value.  Thus, if you spend the night in a room that is normally $900 per night and you spend 30,000 points you are getting 3 cents per mile of value!  I wholeheartedly disagree with this kind of valuation and reject the premise entirely.  Simple economics suggests that something is only worth what someone would pay for it.  I would never actually pay $900 to stay at any hotel so believing I got $900 worth of value from 30,000 points is a bit silly.  What is my opportunity cost of using these points?  Are there other options that would offer more nights?  I would be much happier staying 5 nights in a 5,000 point per night room that usually costs $100 per night even though my value is 2 cents per point, I am much happier.

Another favorite move of bloggers is to overvalue a first class award ticket.  I understand the desire to have bigger seats and more leg room on a plane.  I would also love to fly first class if anyone is interested in proving to me why it is worth doing.  However, I have read many accounts of trips stating, “I used 125,000 miles to fly first class roundtrip on a flight that would have cost $7,500 I maximized value by getting 6 cents per mile!”  Certainly telling your friends that you took a $7,500 flight for free is remarkable.  Again, this kind of valuation ignores the opportunity cost.  Let’s assume that instead you could book an international flight in coach for 50,000 points, but that flight only costs $1,500 normally this is only 3 cents per mile, which is pedestrian compared to the first class flight.  My first thought is that a plane is for transportation.  The goal is to get from point A to point B, if I want to sit in a comfortable chair I would just stay home.  I would never pay the $6,000 fare difference to ride first class so why would I sacrifice 75,000 more points?  What is my opportunity cost of doing this?  Instead of one first class flight I could (assuming award availability) invite a friend along and pay their way and still have 25,000 points to spare.  Many people use Chase Ultimate Rewards to top off their travel, but these 25,000 Ultimate Reward points are minimally worth $250 as a statement credit.  Which sounds like the better scenario, flying alone across the ocean or flying with a friend and arriving with $250 of free money to start?

When it’s all said and done only you can decide what is important to you.  I like to get more value out of my miles by purchasing more happiness and creating more memories.  Sure, I would probably love 1 night at the W. in Washington, D.C., but if I could get a week’s worth of hotel stays instead I am doing that.

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Walt Disney World on a Budget – Saving Money (Tickets) (Part 3)

Save Money at Walt Disney World

Save Money at Walt Disney World

 

Finding a place to stay and determining the best method of travel is only the beginning of the expense for a trip to Walt Disney World.  If you were just wanting to drive to Orlando, Florida and stay in a hotel the total outlay for such a trip would be quite low.  Unlike other Florida vacations, where your family relaxes carelessly (and cheaply) on the beach, you will find no beaches in Orlando.  This is where careful planning might pay off.

The last time I took a trip to Walt Disney World was in 2011.  We had actually thought about visiting Walt Disney World and Universal Studios.  I actually love Universal Studios and find it to be very fun.  However, due to the pricing structures of bothe Walt Disney World and Universal Studios the economics of visiting both parks is difficult to make work.  Both companies charge more for a single day ticket than they do for a multi-day ticket (on a per day basis). From a business perspective it’s a fantastic choice, but for a family wanting to enjoy both parks it can work be difficult to accomodate.  A 1 day ticket to WDW is $95 per adult and $88 per child 3-9.  A 7 day ticket, by comparison is $302 and $282, which breaks down to $43 and $40 per day.  Let’s imagine that on day 8 you wanted to go to Universal Studios for this extra day you would pay about $90 per adult and $85 per child.  Alternatively, you could spend your 8th day at a Disney Park again for an extra 10 bucks per person.  This really complicates the vacation math and in my case made us stay with Walt Disney World for the duration of our 6 day trip.

Ticket Inflation

When you are trying to vacation on a budget, the last thing you want to hear is for someone to recommend you buy in advance of your journey.  In 2011 2 adult tickets for 6 days were $242 each for my wife and me.  This same ticket in 2013 would cost me $296 through Disney.  This is a 18% increase in 2 years!  So one surefire way to save money on your tickets is to buy them early!  When’s the best time to plant a tree?  20 years ago.  When’s the best time to buy a ticket to Walt Disney World?  20 years ago.  If you cannot swing buying them years early definitely buy them before the yearly price increases.

Cheapest Tickets

When purchasing tickets outright the best company that I found was Undercover Tourist.  In 2011 their price was better after tax than Walt Disney World tickets were priced at before tax.  Remember that Undercover Tourist shows total price you pay while the Walt Disney World website just throws the tax in at the end.

Ticket Discounts

Although I purchased my tickets from Undercover Tourist in 2011 I do not know if they are truly the best choice today if you are willing to take a little extra time.  I used the ticket comparison calculator for 2 adults and 2 children on a 6 day ticket the total from Undercover Tourist would be $1,103 while the price through Disneyworld.com is $1,145.  Certainly Undercover Tourist is $42 cheaper which makes them 3.67% cheaper.  If you just want to buy tickets quickly, this is a good bet.

However, if you time your purchase right you can save more than this by paying with a gift card.  Sign up for an American Express Blue Cash Preferred (special offer through card match tool)which gives a $250 sign-up bonus 6% cashback at grocery stores and 0% interest for 15 months ($75 annual fee).  Let’s assume you only get this card for your Disney trip and that’s it.  At my local Kroger they offer an incentive of 2x fuel reward points on any gift card purchase.  During certain times of year they offer 4x fuel reward points on any gift card purchase.  What does that mean?  Every 100 points earned is good for 10 cents off per gallon.  I went to Kroger when they offered 4x fuel reward points and used my American Express card to buy gift cards to pay for Walt Disney World.  The price is $1,145 which will earn me $68.70 cashback and 4,580 fuel reward points.  The rule for gas points is you can redeem up to 1,000 points for $1.00 off 35 gallons of gas.  Purchasing tickets with this method would earn $68.70 (6% cashback) +$250 (sign up bonus) – $75 (annual fee) + $157.50 (gas savings) = $401.20 in total savings on a family of four.  That works out to 35% off which is better than the 3% off offered by Undercover Tourist.  Plus, the 0% interest means you can pay your card off slowly like a nice savings account.  If you really want to amp up the savings take all of your gas with you on the trip and you will be filling up on $1 off gas!  I would not condone, recommend or try this trick myself, you would be saving cash on gas.

Ticket Choices

I have read other advice in the past and have heard many people suggest that people buy Park Hopper,  No-Expiration and other more expensive tickets.  I found the incremental cost to purchase these tickets were not cost effective.  This just goes to show that there are no right answers if two people will recommend opposite things.  As adamant as I am to not get the Park Hopper option, other people suggest it’s “a must”.  I believe Disney is expensive enough and there is enough to do without worrying about such an option.  For instance, if you go to Magic Kingdom, you can leave in the middle of the day and go back to Magic Kingdom.  With a little extra planning you can easily get by without the Park Hopper.

Park Options

Just as opinions vary on what upgrade options should be added to your ticket there are many strong opinions on which parks to see.  I find Epcot to be quite boring when compared to the excitement of Magic Kingdom.  I believe that Animal Kingdom has promise, but currently there’s not enough to do in the park.  That being said, I have had people come up to me and say “Animal Kingdom is so great!” or “I could spend the whole week at Epcot”.  I think that spending a week in Orlando and wasting every day at Epcot would be a punishment.

When my family went we had 6 days.  We went to Magic Kingdom and Hollywood Studios twice and Epcot and Animal Kingdom once each.  I used touringplans.com and undercovertourist.com to plan my trip.  I actually made a spreadsheet and evaluated each day based on expected crowd levels.  I also looked at the calendar to be certain that we were in attendance during “must see” events.  We went to Hollywood Studios on at least one day when Fantasmic was showing.  Without good preparation we could have easily just gone to the park and not known what we missed.

 

 

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Kohls 10x Savings

I love being able to double dip on savings.  Kohls is one of my favorite places because they sell a variety of things and are not afraid of coupons or other discounts.  I used a Visa prepaid gift card that I bought using a cashback credit card.  When I bought this card I made $8.50 in cashback and gas per $100 spent.

I then went to the Chase Ultimate Rewards Mall and clicked on Kohls 10x.  I then proceeded to buy a $100 Kohls gift card earning 10 points per dollar.  This simple transaction earned me 1,000 points which I can use as a statement credit worth $10 or get between $16 and $20 worth of free travel!

Obviously once I get the Kohls card in the mail I will use it through the Ultimate Rewards Mall and earn another 1,000 points.

 

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Discount Gift Cards Lock in the Savings

Using coupons and shopping portals are great avenues for saving money.  It usually takes minimal effort to type into google and find a great coupon code.  The same is true with shopping portals.  It literally takes two minutes and can save many dollars.  I also advocate using reward credit cards to further amplify the cost savings.  This is only a beneficial approach if you pay off your credit cards each month.

Using any one of these methods will save some money, but with a little extra effort and some stacking you can save a lot more money.  Here’s my most recent example.  Yesterday, I used my Blue Cash Preferred American Express (earns 6% cashback) at Kroger to purchase a $500 Visa gift card +$5.95 activation fee.  After taking the 6% cashback into account the card ended up costing about $475, plus I got 500 gas points, which will translate into $17.50 discount on gas.  With the gas and cashback savings that works out to $8.50 per $100 or 8.5%!

I buy dog food from Tractor Supply and try to time my purchases for their discounted prices every couple months.  Usually though I have not been able to gain tremendous value using this method.  However, that’s where buying discount gift cards comes into play.  I took my Visa Gift Card from Kroger and went to TopCashBack.com and clicked to Raise.com.  I found Tractor Supply gift cards for 14% off so I made my $100 gift card purchase, which also earned 3% cashback.  So this portion of the transaction earned me $17 off of $100.

Raise.com emailed me my $100 e-card nearly instantly.  I prefer a physical gift card so I had the idea of using my electronic gift card to buy a physical gift card.  I went through BeFrugal.com to earn 5% cashback.  I put a $100 gift card in my shopping cart and checked out.  I paid with my e-card.  The transaction went through flawlessly.  So I earned another $5 for turning my gift card into another gift card.

Once I receive the gift card in the mail I will use BeFrugal.com again to earn 5% cashback on my purchases of dog food.  The food is usually $31 a bag, but I will wait until the price goes down to $25 a bag.  With all of the discounts stacked, I will be able to get 4 bags of dog food for   $64.50, which is the price I would normally pay for 2 bags of dog food.  Not including discounts or coupons I might find I will save 35.5% by just using cashback portals and credit cards in an advantageous manner.

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Cashback, Gift Cards and Cheap Gas

amazon

I absolutely love to shop at Amazon.com (this is an unpaid shout out).  We are Amazon Prime subscribers and also own a Kindle Fire HD.  I continue to be amazed at the fact that I can order something in the afternoon and it is at my doorstep the next day (for $3.99).  The other thing I love about Amazon is that they always have low prices, the only problem with this is that they do not participate in cashback portal programs (Join TopCashBack.com) or offer coupons for large percentages off your total purchases.  Even without these money saving advantages I am working on  getting 6% off my Amazon purchases at minimal.  This strategy does not only work on Amazon, but can be used successfully for most regular purchases.  Dave Ramsey certainly will not appreciate what I have to say, but that’s just the chance I’ll have to take.

My Blue Cash Preferred AMEX card gets me 6% cashback on all grocery purchases throughout the year (First $6,000).  This cashback amount is in addition to the fantastic $250 signing bonus.  Therefore, I can walk into my local Kroger, buy a $100 Amazon gift card and I will get $6 credited to my card.  This is a fantastic deal as it is, but it is made even better by the fact that my local Kroger also has a daily offer of 2X gas rewards on all gift card purchases.  Therefore, my $100 gift card gets me $6 cashback and 200 gas points!  Fuel reward points are good for .10 off per gallon of gas for every hundred points.  Currently, the offer is even juicier!

Last month I went into Kroger and they were offering 4X fuel reward points on the purchase of a gift card!  So here’s what I did.  Knowing that we buy from Amazon.com constantly I purchased a $250 gift card and paid with my AMEX which earns 6% cashback on grocery store purchases for a total of $15 cashback.  This purchase also earned me 1,000 gas points (250 x 4) which are good for $1.00 off per gallon of gas (up to 35 gallons).  Since we buy gas no matter what, this is a real savings!  We will maximize this savings on all 35 gallons of fuel.  So the $250 gift card – $15 cashback – $35 fuel savings basically makes the $250 gift card $200!  This 4X point deal is available until the end of March and the actual points earned can be used through the end of April.

To further increase savings I will use my 5% cashback gas reward card when paying for the gas.  I do not figure this savings into my actual savings because I would use this card regardless.

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